Articles Posted in Assault

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At some point in September, a police officer had an argument with a man with regards to the servicing of the officer’s beeper. The two had a verbal argument inside the man’s store and the man told the officer to leave. According to the man, he did not strike or threaten the officer. Nevertheless, the police officer calls for other authority to come to the store. When uniformed officers arrived at the scene, the police officer told them that she was also a police and she wanted the officers to arrest the man. The uniformed officers therefore complied. At the time of the incident, the police officer was not in uniform and was not working a tour of duty.

After the man was released from jail, he received an electronic page requesting him to call the police officer’s cousin. During the telephone conversation, the police officer’s cousin told the man that the police officer would be willing to drop the assault charge if the man will paid her $5000. After some negotiation, the police officer’s cousin and the man agreed upon $3000 as the price for dropping the charge. Later that day, the man contacted some detectives and enlisted their assistance in the matter.

Subsequently, the man meet-up with the offenders after they discussed the payment and the agreement about the charge. At the scene, the police officer placed a telephone call in which she allegedly spoke with an unidentified person about dropping the charges. The man then gave $3000 to another individual while the police officer was standing nearby during the exchange. The aforementioned transaction was then monitored by the agents. Consequently, the police officer and her colleague were arrested at the scene, immediately following the exchange.

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One evening, the complainant was working in a grocery store when he became involved in a dispute with his employer, one of the respondents, over the payment of back wages. After all of the customers had left the store, manager instructed another employee, to lock the door. Respondents then allegedly attacked the complainant, beating and kicking him with their hands and feet, and assaulting him with various weapons. According to the complainant, during the course of the assault he was hit in the head with a gun by one of the respondents, another hit him in the face and forehead with a closed knife, and the other hit him in the head and back of the neck with a stick. The complainant lost consciousness and suffered injuries which included a broken facial bone. All four assailants were subsequently arrested and indicted on charges, inter alia, of having acted in concert to commit one count of assault in the second degree by use of a dangerous instrument, and one count of menacing in the second degree.

A Kings County Criminal Lawyer said that after inspecting and reviewing the grand jury minutes, the Supreme Court dismissed the assault and menacing counts of the indictment, concluding that they were duplicitous. Although the court thereafter granted the People’s motion for leave to reargue, it adhered to its determination dismissing the assault and menacing counts. In support of its conclusion that the counts were duplicitous, the court noted that the complainant had testified that three of the four defendants assaulted him with different weapons during the attack, and that each weapon caused discrete physical injuries to different parts of his body. The court also reasoned that the assault count had been submitted to the grand jury “in a manner which did not require 12 or more grand jurors to find that any particular item was the instrumentality which caused the complainant’s physical injury.” During the pendency of the People’s appeal from the order made upon reargument, the Supreme Court, sua sponte, reconsidered the issues raised by the parties’ prior motions, and adhered to the determination made in that order. There was no drug found and Burglary was not involved.

The Supreme Court disagreed with the court’s conclusion that the subject counts are duplicitous, reverse the determination in the order made upon reargument, and reinstate the first and third counts of the indictment. Each count of an indictment may charge only one offense, and a count which charges the commission of a particular offense occurring repeatedly during a designated period of time is duplicitous. The requirement that separate counts of an indictment charge no more than one offense serves to ensure that a defendant is provided with “fair notice of the charges against him so that he can defend himself and establish the defense of double jeopardy if an attempt is made to reprosecute him after acquittal or conviction of those charges”. Prohibiting duplicitous counts also prevents the possibility that individual jurors might vote to convict a defendant of a count on the basis of different offenses, thus permitting a conviction even though no unanimous verdict has been reached.

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On March 4, 2009, a woman and her sons (hereinafter collectively the respondents) filed three separate family offense petitions seeking the entry of orders of protection in favor of them and against the appellant, the woman’s mother and her sons’ grandmother. The alleged family offenses included assault, harassment, and menacing. In their respective petitions, the respondents described how they were related to the appellant and asserted that the parties all resided together in a home in Nassau County. The petitions detailed certain incidents which allegedly occurred on February 19, 2009, on the island of Anguilla. According to the respondent children, their grandmother pushed their mother to the floor twice, causing her to hurt her back and hit her head. The grandmother allegedly was screaming, yelling, and cursing at the woman during the criminal assault. In addition, the grandmother allegedly used a glass bowl to strike a child on the head, causing injuries. Further, the grandmother allegedly chased the younger son with a meat cleaver and threw an ashtray at him, which hit him in the back.

Thereafter, on March 6, 2009, the appellant grandmother filed three of her own family offense petitions seeking orders of protection in her favor and against the respondents. She alleged that on or about February 14, 2009, also in Anguilla, her daughter and her grandsons committed the family offenses of aggravated harassment in the second degree, harassment in the first degree, attempted assault, and menacing in the third degree. Domestic violence all.

During an initial appearance before the Family Court, the grandmother’s counsel objected to the court’s exercise of subject matter jurisdiction because the alleged offenses occurred in Anguilla. The Family Court held that the fact that the event took place in the West Indies is no different from it taking place in Pennsylvania, Virginia, or Vermont. They’re all residents of Nassau County and they’re entitled to protection from future occurrences. Family Orders of Protection are to prevent further hostility and further assault, attempted assault, etc.

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A Nassau Criminal Lawyer said that, respondent has been charged with assault in the third degree. This criminal prosecution is pending in the District Court, Nassau County. The complaining witness has commenced a civil action against the County of Nassau alleging, inter alia, that respondent’s alleged assault on her was accomplished with the “knowledge and acquiescence of the County of Nassau”. This civil action is pending in the Supreme Court, Nassau County. domestic violence was not involved.

In the course of defending the County of Nassau in connection with the civil action, a representative of the County Attorney asked the Nassau County Police Department to conduct an “internal investigation”. It is clear that the materials gathered during the course of the internal investigation were segregated from the materials generated by County police officers in the course of their investigation into the criminal complaint. It is also clear that “the results of the civil investigation were forwarded to the County Attorney’s Office for its use in defending the County of Nassau”. Grand Larceny was not an issue.

A Nassau Assault Lawyer said that, during the course of the criminal prosecution of respondent, the District Court issued two subpoenas duces tecum, the first at the request of the District Attorney, the second at the request of the attorney for the respondent. Both of these subpoenas were aimed at the internal investigation file maintained by the County of Nassau in connection with its defense of the civil action. The Countys application to quash the first subpoena was granted by the District Court in an order dated February 11, 1991. No appeal was taken from that order.

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Defendant was charged, in a felony complaint, inter alia, with Robbery in the first Degree and Criminal Possession of a Weapon in the Second Degree. Thereafter, upon learning that the People were about to present evidence to a grand jury, defendant gave notice of his intent to appear and testify before that body. Defendant’s attorney sent a handwritten letter to the People, confirming an earlier conversation, stating that since the People were presenting only the weapon charge, defendant requests that he be permitted to sign a waiver of immunity only as to this charge. Defense counsel also asked for a judicial ruling if the People failed to grant this request. Later, the People sent a letter to defense counsel stating that, in confirmation of an earlier conversation, it was understood that defendant did not wish to testify if only the weapon charge was presented. Accordingly, only this charge was presented to the grand jury and an indictment was voted charging defendant with Criminal Possession of a Weapon in the Third Degree.

A Kings County criminal attorney said that the People maintain that defense counsel’s letter misconstrued their initial oral conversation and that the parties had a second oral conversation after counsel’s letter where they resolved their misunderstanding. The People further contend that their letter reflected the agreement reached at this subsequent conversation. Defendant, however, does not admit that any second conversation occurred. Rather, defendant asserts that the People’s letter was written in response to their initial conversation and incorrectly stated defendant’s position.

The issue to be resolved in this case is whether a defendant is entitled, as a matter of right, to testify under a “limited” waiver of immunity 2 is subject to divergent views by nisi prius courts.

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Defendant is charged with one count of Criminally Negligent Homicide, three counts of Assault in the Second Degree and two counts of Offering a False Instrument for Filing in the First Degree. The charges arise from an accident in a taxicab driven by the Defendant on West Street in the vicinity of West Houston Street in Manhattan in 2006. In the accident, one of the passengers in Defendant’s taxi, either exited or was ejected from the cab and was then struck and killed by a second taxi. Three other passengers in the taxi suffered significant injuries while still in the cab when the vehicle struck a building.

A New York Criminal Lawyer said that, the People allege that the accident was caused by a seizure the Defendant suffered. It is also alleged that the Defendant had a history of seizures and fraudulently failed to disclose this information in applications for a taxi license he filed. Based on this seizure history, his alleged deception in obtaining his taxi license, the fact that he had stopped taking seizure medications at the time of the accident and the fact that a seizure allegedly caused the accident, the People allege that the Defendant caused the passenger’s death with criminal negligence. Criminally Negligent Homicide is a Class E non-violent felony punishable by a maximum indeterminate sentence for a first felony offender, like Defendant here, of 1 1/3 to 4 years in state prison. A Bronx Criminal Lawyer said that, defendant is also charged with three counts of Assault in the Second Degree, a Class D violent felony, for each of the three injured victims who were present in the taxi. Defendant contends that he did not, in fact, suffer a seizure at the time of the accident. He will also apparently contend at trial that he did not, in any respect, act with criminal negligence during the accident and thus cannot be held criminally responsible for the death or injuries which occurred.

A Bronx Defense Lawyer said that, defendant moves to dismiss the three counts of Assault in the Second Degree which are charged in the indictment. The Defendant acknowledges that he would not likely be entitled to dismiss before trial charges which alleged that the Defendant had committed the crime of Assault in the Third Degree with respect to the three injured victims pursuant to Penal Law § 120.00 (3), a Class A misdemeanor, on the facts alleged here. That statute provides that a defendant is guilty of this crime when “with criminal negligence, he causes physical injury to another person by means of a deadly weapon or a dangerous instrument”.

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Plaintiff alleges that on October 10, 2007 at the nightclub “Tenjune,” in the Meatpacking District of New York City, defendant, an NBA basketball player “grabbed the plaintiff’s buttocks and `crotch’ area on multiple occasions without her permission and consent.” A New York Criminal Lawyer said that, plaintiff, now moves by order to show cause to proceed anonymously to avoid the possibility of unwanted publicity and the exacerbation of the emotional distress suffered from the alleged incident.

According to the complaint, plaintiff and defendant were within the premises known as Tenjune, located on Little West 12th Street, New York, New York. Plaintiff alleges that defendant “willfully and intentionally verbally threatened her after grabbing her buttocks and `crotch’ area.” It is claimed that the “battery and assault which was committed upon the plaintiff, was not in any way brought on by nor provoked by the plaintiff.” A Bronx Sex Crime Lawyer said that, plaintiff alleges that defendant’s actions amounted to a series of harmful or offensive contacts to the plaintiff’s person, all of which were done intentionally by the defendant, without her consent. Plaintiff also alleges that defendant’s actions were reckless, extreme and outrageous, and created a reasonable apprehension in plaintiff of immediate harmful or offensive contact. As a proximate result of defendant’s actions, plaintiff has allegedly sustained “physical injury, serious psychological and emotional distress, mental anguish, embarrassment and humiliation.” Plaintiff also has allegedly incurred medical expenses and other economic damages, continues to be “sick, sore, lame and disabled” and is unable to pursue her usual activities and employment.

In support of her application to proceed anonymously, plaintiff argues that Civil Rights Law § 50-b was enacted to provide a limited right of privacy to a specific class of individuals, namely, victims of alleged sex crimes. Plaintiff further argues that, based upon the allegations set out in the complaint, it is clear that she is an intended beneficiary of this statute. Plaintiff contends that this is potentially going to be a high-profile case due to defendant’s status as a professional athlete. Therefore, plaintiff should be allowed to proceed anonymously.

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Suffolk Drug Crime 11

In this case of the People of the State of New York verses the defendants Smithtown General Hospital, L.S., D.L, H.M, L.S., and M.C., are charged with allowing a prosthetic devices salesman to participate in a meaningful way during a surgical procedure that was being performed at the Smithtown General Hospital without the knowledge or consent of the patient. This case is being heard in the Supreme Court, Criminal Term, of Suffolk County Part II.

Case Background

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This involves a criminal jurisdiction case where it was ruled that the courts of the United States have jurisdiction, under section 5346 of the Revised Statutes, to try a person for an assault with a dangerous weapon, committed on a vessel belonging to a citizen of the United States, when such vessel is in the Detroit river, out of the jurisdiction of any particular state, and within the territorial limits of the dominion of Canada.

In February, 1888, the defendant and others, were indicted in the district court of the United States for the eastern district of Michigan for assaulting, in August, 1887, with a dangerous weapon on board of the steamer Alaska, a vessel belonging to citizens of the United States, and then being within the admiralty jurisdiction of the United States, and not within the jurisdiction of any particular state of the United States, viz. within the territorial limits of the dominion of Canada.

The indictment contained six counts, charging the offense to have been committed in different ways, or with different intent, and was remitted to the circuit court for the sixth circuit of the eastern district of Michigan. There the defendant filed a plea to the jurisdiction of the court, alleging that it had no jurisdiction of the matters charged, as appeared on the face of the indictment, and to the plea a demurrer was filed.

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Plaintiff commenced this action seeking damages for false arrest, false imprisonment and malicious prosecution, based upon his arrest for assault which later became a murder charge for acts allegedly committed. Plaintiff was incarcerated for 333 days. The charges remained pending for nearly 8 more months after plaintiff was released from custody. A New York Criminal Lawyer said that, all charges were dismissed on the motion of the Bronx County District Attorney. After trial in this action, the jury rendered a verdict in favor of plaintiff, awarding damages to plaintiff in the sum of 2.7 million dollars for false arrest and 7.1 million dollars for malicious prosecution.

A Bronx Criminal Lawyer said that, defendant, the City of New York (City) now moves pursuant to CPLR 2221 and 4404 (a) for an order (1) setting aside the jury’s verdict on liability as a matter of law, or, in the alternative, (2) setting aside the jury’s verdict and ordering a new trial as the jury’s liability verdict is against the weight of the evidence, or, in the alternative, (3) dismissing the malicious prosecution claim for failure to prove proximate cause, or, in the alternative, (4) setting aside the damages verdict and ordering a new trial on damages as the jury award was excessive and contrary to the weight of the evidence, and for other related relief.

Plaintiff opposes the motion. A New York Criminal Lawyer said the City’s renewal of its trial motion to dismiss the complaint for failure to establish a prima facie case or for a directed verdict is denied as the court adheres to its original decision on the record.

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